Coming soon: New food, drink and more

As seen this past month on Facebook, things are happening in Woodstock: New places to eat and drink will open soon or soonish, and several marijuana-related businesses appear to be in the works. For details, click the yellow icons on this handy map — or just read the paragraphs below it.

But before you do: Remember that you have a voice in “what’s next” in Woodstock: Make time to attend the Land Use Committee meetings, third Wednesday each month. Read More»

Land Use Committee Breaks New Ground Starting July 20

Land Use Committee meeting
Weds., July 20, 7 to 8:30 p.m.
Woodstock Community Center
5905 SE 43rd Ave.

Things are changing quickly in and near the Woodstock neighborhood, so the Woodstock Neighborhood Association’s Land Use Committee (LUC) is following suit. Starting this month, meetings are to be more organized and efficient. Four 15-minute segments plus spillover time will help keep things moving along.

The LUC’s first task will be to build and prioritize a list of crucial topics to track, most likely including unimproved streets, infill housing, slowing down traffic on Woodstock and/or Steele, and more. Want a hand in shaping the future of the neighborhood? Come to the LUC meeting this and every month.

 

Infill Project Affects Woodstock; Comment by August 15

GenHousePic_1_tThe Residential Infill Project* is a set of proposals to alter residential housing over a large area of Portland, including Woodstock. It’s a mixed bag of good and bad news for both developers and residents. It could lead to more houses being demolished and replaced, but may also encourage more dwellings of a smaller scale in square feet and/or price. The proposals will affect our quality of life — so it’s up to all Woodstockians to inform themselves and add insightful comments to the process before the August 15 deadline. Read More»

Toxic air: A Woodstock-specific update

woodstockhotspots
Click the map image to see it larger.

As you’ve probably heard, the U.S. Forest Service measured Portland moss samples in 2013 and found some locations with high levels of toxic elements. More details released earlier in June indicate that two locations within the Woodstock neighborhood boundary are among the top eight for nickel and cadmium — but they have not been characterized by the DEQ as within the top tier of four locations with the most discouraging results. Read More»

WNA Wants You! Board Nominations Due May 4

Screenshot 2016-04-03 at 11.10.52 PMLend a little of your time and energy to Woodstock, and help make a great place to live even greater. Nominate yourself or a friend for one of the following WNA Board positions by May 4.

  • Chair
  • Co-Chair, Land Use Committee
  • Chair, Friends of the Woodstock Community Center
  • Financial Manager, Friends of the Woodstock Community Center
  • Web Administrator
  • Chair, Events Committee
  • Area Representative

The Woodstock Neighborhood Association’s annual board election is just around the corner, and we are looking for a few good candidates. We have rather big shoes to fill, in that Terry Griffiths and Lonnie Port are both stepping down after many dedicated years of service as chairpersons of the Land Use Committee and Friends of the Woodstock Community Center, respectively.

We welcome people with new ideas and vision to join our volunteer team. Anyone who is nominated or nominates themselves should possess a strong interest and preferably some experience that matches the board opening — but mentoring is available, so don’t be shy if you’re a little green but want to gain valuable experience. Neighborhood Associations are a great place to learn and practice leadership skills within a supportive community. There are also openings for “neighborhood rep” in different sections of the neighborhood.

For more info, contact WNA Chair Becky Luening at info@woodstockpdx.org.

Update: Plans in Flux for Park’s Off-leash Area

Cross-section of the If you’re a frequent user of Woodstock Park, you may be wondering why previously reported plans for a natural divider between the dog off-leash area (DOLA) and the playground have not progressed. At this writing, it appears the parks department has the project on hold due to concerns received directly from park neighbors. There is talk of an extended planning/presentation/feedback process. Watch for details here as they emerge.

Background: tensions ran high last fall when a child was injured by a dog on the playground. The parks department proposed a divider between the playground and the adjacent dog off-leash area (DOLA for short). At February’s meeting of the Woodstock Neighborhood Association (first Wednesday of each month, 7 p.m. at the Woodstock Community Center), city reps presented what they had in mind for spring. You can download and view their presentation, but keep in mind it’s a big (7MB) PDF file.

 

Spring Gardening Alert: Beware Sinkholes

cesspool
This isn’t David’s sinkhole, but it’s similar.

Beware, gardeners: After a winter’s heavy rain, your yard could swallow you whole. That was one takeaway from the neighborhood association’s February meeting, where Woodstock neighbor David Nordstrom shared his hair-raising encounter with a sinkhole.

In short, David stepped out in his yard at SE Insley near 60th one evening, felt the ground give way beneath him, and found himself in a slim, brick-lined pit nine feet deep. He escaped serious injury and began an investigation.

The pit turned out to be a cesspool, a popular option for sewage disposal in years gone by. Typically a house’s toilet(s) were piped to it, with the brick lining slowing the absorption of sewage into the soil. David’s house is from 1948, but others at the meeting reported finding similar pits at houses built as late as 1954. A similar kind of vintage pit is a cistern or drywell for rain drainage, like the one responsible for a death in 2010. Either could be covered with wood, then layers of soil. Eventually the wood rots, and then….

David found a permit to fill his pit on file from 2006, before the house was his. The permit’s status, nearly ten years later, was still “under review,” so apparently the work was never completed. David recommended looking up your house on Portland Maps and checking for any incomplete permits. He also recommended City of Portland employee Erin Mick as someone who can guide you through the process of “decommissioning” — that is, filling — any pit you find lurking.

That was last month. Who knows what you’ll learn at the next Woodstock Neighborhood Association meeting: first Wednesday of each month, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Woodstock Community Center (5905 SE 43rd Ave.).